Native Americans used their knowledge and found out way to use things without using the technology that we are using today to make things. They found ways to communicate with other Native Americans by using smoke from fire and having messengers. They would use blankets to make the smoke bigger and able to be noticed by other Native Americans. By using messengers they would tell someone that they need to go and tell something to someone else that is in a different area.

To this day we do not use the language that the Native Americans used when they were here. They would make up their one language and would talk all around their villages.

The smoke was a way of telling others that there was a village there or nearby campers. Smoke was a common communication tool that they used. The smoke also signify a forest fire, brush fire, or means a nearby campers. It's also a symbol of back in the old days when there was peace and war in North America.

Many people that can read smoke signals. Even animals such as monkeys can notice it too. Now, when we see smoke its looks like there is something that is in danger or something has been caught on fire.

How to make a smoke signal efficient:
Have someone else with you to make your own signals and have code that you both can understand them. Find a place where you can see or notice the signals. A good way to communicate is to have smoke signals that you can see from a high view or at at good view from somewhere. They would build something called a fire bowl on hill tops.

Tips for making a smoke signal.
One puff means "Attention!"
Two puffs means "All's well!"
Three puffs or three fires means "Trouble!" or "Help!"


Credits:

Text: Anthony B

Banner: Bailey B and Tristen J

Internet Credits:
http://www.inquiry.net/outdoor/native/sign/smoke-signal.htm
http://www.ehow.com/how_5686316_read-native-american-smoke-signals.html


Image Credits:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frederic_Remington_smoke_signal.jpg {{CC, by Ellywa from Wikimedia Commons}}





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St. Mark's Senior Second. School,
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