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  PARTICIPATING SCHOOLS
1
 Point Option High School
 Virginia. USA
2
 C S Ramachary Memorial   Matriculation School
 Madurai, India
3
 Wako Kokusai High School
 Wako. Japan
 
 
 
 
HISTORY OF BLUE CRABS

Blue crabs have been living in the Chesapeake Bay for many centuries. They have lived, and prospered amongst the creatures in the dark blue bay. When Man came, he gave an unwanted gift to the bay, and all those who live in it. That gift was pollution. For years we have been throwing our trash into the bay, dumping waste from our factories. We are slowly killing the bay with our pollutants.

The Blue Crabs have dwindled in size over the past few years. Many factors are in this. Some include overfishing, but the main problem is the pollution, for the pollution has thoroughly placed its mark upon the land. It has killed their food. It has killed the grasses they call home. It has killed them. Now they resort to cannibalism, and are easy prey, for once they use to be invincible, invisible. Without the grass they have nowhere to hide. Nowhere to run.

An experiment was carried out in our classroom, to test our theory that the grass will help the Blue Crab's survival rate. One tank was nothing but gravel and oyster shells; the crabs were out in the open. Some tried to bury under the gravel. Many failed. Without something to hide behind, they attacked each other; ate each other. One was left... the king of the tank. He fought the others, and won. The other tank was full of life. The ribbon strands, even though imitation, helped a great deal. They clung onto them, wove in between them. Never to be seen. Many survived; a complete turnaround. Without the grass, the turnout would have been the same as the other. The total was counted. In our first tank, out of 28, only one was left. The second tank, out of 28, 10 survived.

The grass has helped the Blue Crabs. It has given them shelter, comfort, and protection. Without the grass they can not hide, they can not survive. But in order for them to do this, we must clean out the bay. Our pollution now resides in it, killing off life slowly, painfully. There will be an end to this, or the bay will end, life will end. One bay may not seam like much, but a bay is connected to an ocean, and countless rivers. Water flowing through the bay will pick up all the poisons we have placed, and spread it to wherever it goes. This is serious, a matter of life, or death.

The endless waves of boats stride into the bay, throwing their nets out in the open. The metallic traps hit the bottom, waiting for something to crawl in. Like a ring of death, the boats surround the bay... waiting, watching. Hours come, hours go. They bring upon their decks a net, uproot the traps and peer inside. Hours have been wasted, they have hardly anything. Go to shore, go to the market; sell what you can, eat what is left. The cycle repeats. Overfishing is also a problem in the life of the Blue Crab. The young ones can not mature, as they are caught, cut, cleaned, and eaten. They do not mature... only die. Few are lucky, and live on, and might reproduce. But the few, who were not caught, still have predators to fear. Will they live on another day? Will they be eaten by the metallic mouth, or in the claws of another?

We will clean up our act, as the problems we cause are massive. We will replant life, for without life, the planet will slowly die. We will hold off our fleets, their catch will drive to extinction. We will do this, for the sake of us, for the sake of the bay, and for the sake of our children's children. Life needs to be brought back, but before that can be done, we need to fix the problems our unwanted gift has caused. There is no waiting, there is only doing. The longer we hold it off, the worse it will get.

 
 
 
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